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IT MEANS DISTANT. Telephone, television, telescope, telegram and, if you’re ancient, telegraph. Communication today, even between close friends and family members, is tele-

CARMEL BACH FESTIVAL 2020 CANCELED

JUST ANNOUNCED no thanks to COVID-19 and Shelter-in-Place. It’s only the third cancellation since the Festival was founded in 1935.

CAMERATA SINGERS JOIN THE SHUTDOWN

BLAMED ON THE COVID-19 pandemic, the Camerata Singers Board of Directors has made the difficult yet necessary decision to cancel the May 8 & 9 performances of the Duruflé Requiem. This was to be John Koza’s final concert with the Camerata Singers before retiring after twenty years at the helm. He and his wife Susan are planning to move to Tucson, Arizona later this year.

OREGON BACH FESTIVAL GOING DOWN?

‘SORE WOUNDED’ OREGON BACH may not recover. 2020 festival shut down; music director search put on hold. Click HERE

SMUIN BALLET’S WEDNESDAY STREAM

SMUIN CONTEMPORARY BALLET announces Trey McIntyre’s hit Oh, Inverted World (see image by David Allen, top of the page) as the next installment of its Hump Day Ballets series. Applauded by The New York Times as “irresistible” and “amazingly fresh,” McIntyre’s intoxicating pop ballet is set to music by influential indie band The Shins. As part of the Hump Day Ballets series, which aims to brighten mid-week spirits with free video streaming of a ballet from Smuin’s archives, Oh, Inverted World will be offered beginning Wednesday, April 29, 2020. The release will be accompanied by a video introduction by Smuin dancers Jonathan Powell and Erin Yarbrough-Powell, who performed in the world premiere of Oh, Inverted World. The recorded performance will be available for 48 hours only, with streaming instructions announced through Smuin’s email list (sign up at smuinballet.org), or via Smuin’s Facebook (facebook.com/SmuinBallet) and Instagram (instagram.com/smuinballet). Click HERE

THE HYPERTRAGIC NOTCH

TO BE CLEAR, record companies everywhere are still making and releasing CD recordings, even though there has been much buzz about downloads putting CDs out to pasture. Don’t believe it, especially if you prefer to collect ‘hard copies.’ They are available.

GIANANDREA NOSEDA is so sought-after that he is exactly as busy as he wants to be. The Music Director of the National Symphony Orchestra, Kennedy Center, also serves as Principal Guest Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra and Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Principal Conductor of the Orquestra de Cadaqués, and Artistic Director of the Stresa Festival in Italy. In July 2018, the Zurich Opera House appointed him the next General Music Director beginning in the 2021–2022 season where the centerpiece of his tenure will be a new Ring Cycle directed by Andreas Homoki, the opera house’s artistic director. Meanwhile, he has given a much needed shot in the arm to the National Symphony, an orchestra that endured more ups and downs than national pride should by definition inspire. This new release, recorded during live performances last June, offers startlingly good evidence of Noseda’s impact in Washington at a time when most news from there is extremely discouraging. Copland’s Billy the Kid sparkles with color and rigorous energy. Dvořák’s “New World” Symphony crackles and pops propulsively, its first movement erupting after the adagio beginning into its pageant of three—yes three—contrasting themes. Even the often-standalone second movement (largo) eschews sentimentality in favor of restrained dignity. The scherzo flies out of the gate with the elfin sparkle of Mendelssohn while its contrasting ‘B’ section captures the Bohemian lilt that sets Dvořák apart. The finale snaps with fire. The National Symphony still shows some “lace along the seams” (apologies to Joni Mitchell) but under Noseda live is live and they are certainly going in the right direction. SM

NEW PBO& SERIES LAUNCHES

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE Orchestra & Chorale (PBO) breaks new ground as a pioneer in bridging new music with old instruments, as PBO announces a collection of commissioned works composed by GRAMMY and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Caroline Shaw. “PBO& Caroline Shaw” launches the “PBO&” imprimatur, created to record and showcase vital contemporary composers who are committed to composing for the unique sounds of period instruments. The recording was released on April 3. PBO has cultivated a fruitful partnership with Caroline Shaw that began in 2016 with the launch of the organization’s “New Music for Old Instruments” initiative, designed to demonstrate the influence of old music on new music, and to encourage Shaw and other contemporary composers to explore the possibilities of writing for an ensemble that plays on period instruments and applies the techniques of historical performance. The album comprises the Is a Rose trilogy of three works written for mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, the first of which is “Red, Red Rose.” The second work, “The Edge,” premiered in 2017, and the final work in the trilogy, “And So,” had its world premiere to a sold-out audience at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center. “The Listeners,” Shaw’s first major work for chorus and period instrument orchestra, spotlights the low-register voices of Avery Amereau and bass-baritone Dashon Burton. The release of PBO& Caroline Shaw follows close on the heels of Shaw’s GRAMMY Award for Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance in 2019 for her recording of Orange, an album produced by the Attacca Quartet. PBO& Caroline Shaw was recorded live at First Congregational Church in Berkeley in March and October, 2019.

CABRILLO SERVES UP SHAW’S PULITZER

ROOMFUL OF TEETH vocal octet performed Shaw’s Pulitzer-winning Partita at the 2019 Cabrillo Festival of Contemporaty Music. Their performance is being offered in two parts. For Part 1, click HERE

MORE FRIENDS OF PAMB CHIME IN

“JUST A NOTE to say how much we appreciate Performing Arts Monterey Bay’s Weekly Magazine. And by we, I think I speak for the majority of the members of the performing arts community. There was a time when theater was given reasonable coverage by the general press. Now, we’re lucky to get a single story from time to time. Nonprofit theater depends heavily on stories and reviews to let the public know of our existence. Some can afford advertising but it is usually modest at best. I am aware that you need it as well but that has not kept you from giving all of us space to help us stay alive. This makes your Magazine a must read for anyone who cares about live music, theater, dance and opera.” Walt DeFaria, Carmel

“FOR THE PAST SEVEN YEARS I look forward each Tuesday to reading the Weekly Magazine published by Performing Arts Monterey, which announces all the upcoming arts programs, reviews past events, and introduces us to a vast array of national and global arts news in written and digital formats. In addition, PAMB shares articles about a wide variety of national and global artists, performances and other ‘antidotes.’ The Weekly Magazine publication is full of video clips and many intriguing surprises. Now, with the Coronavirus pandemic and Shelter-in-Place orders, there are no public arts events taking place. Yet, PAMB continues to bring us all kinds of interesting, art-centered information in his diverse and engaging style.” Fran Spector, SpectorDance, Marina

JOHN TAVENER’S FINAL OPERA IN THE QUEUE

MAGICAL, MYSTICAL TAVENER (1944-2013) opera Krishna will finally see the light of day, thanks to support from Prince Charles. Click HERE

CELLIST JOY LISNEY PLAYS ELGAR

 

HARPIST WILLIAM FAULKNER

HE PLAYED a recital at Monterey’s Colton Hall in February, but we missed the notice. We featured him in our Performing Arts People in 2015, and republish it here. Be sure to follow the link to his La Llorana variations. Click HERE  PS Happy Birthday Bill

MERCEDES SOSA AND JOAN BAEZ

SPANISH with Italian subtitiles

 

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Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca CR Brooks, associate editor