Weekly Magazine

TWO LOCAL PRODIGIES SCORE BIG

MONTEREY NATIVE, COMPOSER/FILMMAKER ALEXANDER JANKO’S movie, Year By The Sea, takes numerous film festival awards. (Pictured, Janko and Joan Anderson whose memoirs became his muse.)

4 AUDIENCE CHOICE: Rhode Island International Film Festival, Naperville Independent YBTS-AndersonFilm Festival, Berkshire International Film Festival, Vail Film Festival

2 BEST FEATURE: On Location: Memphis International Film & Music Festival, Carpe Diem Andretta Award — Woodstock Film Festival

2 GRAND PRIZE: Rhode Island International Film Festival, Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking: Screenwriting — Newport Beach Film Festival

1 BEST MUSIC: Alexander Janko — Hamilton Film Festival

7 ACTOR AWARDS: Best Actress (Karen Allen) — Hamilton Film Festival, Best Actress (Karen Allen) — Naperville Independent Film Festival, Women in Film Award (Karen Allen) — St. Louis International Film Festival, Creative Vision Award (Karen Allen) — Rhode Island International Film Festival, Renaissance Award (Karen Allen) — Port Townsend Film Festival, Vanguard Award (Karen Allen) — Vail Film Festival, Best Ensemble Cast — Best Actors Film Festival

Janko is working on a local premiere screening in Monterey in January as a benefit for Youth Music Monterey County.

mcgowanCARMEL NATIVE, COMPOSER NED McGOWAN fulfills a commission for the six-member, Grammy-winning Eighth Blackbird ensemble which premiered the piece earlier this month in The Netherlands. Titled Garden of Iniquitous Creatures, McGowan describes it as, “a rhythmic piece, weaving together influences from Metal, Carnatic, Minimalism, the music of Frank Zappa, George Crumb and Conlon Nancarrow.” It will be included in Eighth Blackbird’s next CD.

‘TIS THE SEASON

FOR CHORAL MUSIC. Choirs and choruses from all over are singing their joy, with more in the coming weeks. Check out the Classical category of our CALENDAR for this week’s details.

“VIENNA IN THE VALLEY”

1318FOR NINE DAYS, starting on New Year’s Day, stars of opera and song will gather at Hidden Valley Music Seminars in a “Winter Intensive” for singers and collaborative pianists. Carmel’s Susanne Mentzer and Carmel Valley’s Stewart Robertson, both from international careers, will host celebrated opera and concert baritone Sir Thomas Allen (photo by Sussie Ahlburg) and renowned pianist, partner of great singers, scholar and recording artist, Graham Johnson. ‘Student’ singers have been selected, and the workshops on song, lieder and opera will be open to the interested public without charge. Music by Schubert, Mozart, Brahms, Mahler and Strauss will provide working material. More details in the week after Christmas.

FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY

osborneSTING LIKE A BEE. Steven Osborne’s new Hyperion CD of late-Beethoven piano sonatas makes an indelible impression. After the Monterey Symphony’s program in October, when the audience thinned out ahead of Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, I wondered if Beethoven was in danger of becoming irrelevant for today’s audiences. Thankfully, Osborne is ready to duke it out on behalf of the famously-deaf composer. Multi-award winning performer and prolific recording artist, the British pianist made his US debut at Carnegie Hall in 2005, and has since appeared with American orchestras and at music festivals. With an international reputation, he plays some of the most challenging music in the keyboard repertoire, including works by Franz Liszt, Charles Valentin Alkan and Olivier Messiaen. This new release opens with the great “Hammerklavier” sonata, a 40-minute tour de force, begun in 1816, that shows how the composer was still discovering the possibilities of the instrument. It does hammer, but its Adagio sostenuto is profoundly felt, passionate and very ‘sentimento.’ The finale develops a tremendous fugue. The disc includes the previous Op 101 sonata in A, half as long but also with a final, whimsical fugue, and even shorter Op 90 in E Minor, all charm with little ambition which is why it is rarely programmed. It’s a new release with power, adventure and delight.

REMEMBER WHEN FIGARO WAS SET AT TRUMP TOWER?

MICHAEL COOPER does in the New York Times. Portentous of a ‘new feudalism?’ Click HERE

THE GREAT MAURIZIO POLLINI PLAYS THE BEATLES

MICHELLE, MA BELLE  à la Mozart with the Vienna Philharmonic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IT’S OFFICIAL: MANY ORCHESTRAS ARE KEPT AFLOAT IN SPITE OF EARNED INCOME

TODAY, ON AVERAGE, American orchestras take in more charitable contributions than they earn through ticket sales, according to a new report released last week by the League of American Orchestras. Click HERE  The NY Times article includes a link to the complete report.

oliverosCOMPOSER PAULINE OLIVEROS DIES AT 84

A LONGTIME pioneer of new music, she was well-known and much-admired on both coasts. Click HERE

 

THREE-YEAR-OLD PLAYS BEETHOVEN

COME ON! She has to be at least four!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca RC Brooks, associate editor