Weekly Magazine

Violin

YES, IT’S A PAGE of sheet music. Can you see the 3-D violin floating in front of it?  Hint: relax your eyes and look through the image, not at it.

COMING UP THIS WEEK

MIRIAM ELLIS brings her annual International Playhouse to UCSC. MONTEREY SYMPHONY gives regional premiere of Antonín Dvořák’s Piano Concerto in G Minor, featuring Michael Noble, first prize winner of the Carmel Music Society’s 2013 piano competition. Max Bragado-Darman also conducts Otto Nicolai’s Merry Wives of Windsor overture, completing the Symphony’s ‘Season of Shakespeare,’ and Cesar Franck’s great Symphony in Dchucho Minor. SAN JOSE SYMPHONIC CHOIR visits Seaside’s St Francis Xavier. Jazz guitarist BRUCE FORMAN presents his new THE RED GUITAR; a Jazz Libretto at Carmel’s Cherry Center. TAELEN THOMAS and friends enact scenes from Jane Smiley’s Horse Heaven, one time only on Sunday afternoon. The MONTEREY PENINSULA COLLEGE ORCHESTRA, directed by David Dally, will present a concert Monday, 7:30pm, in the MPC Music Hall, including Dvořák’s Symphony 8, Verdi’s Nabucco Overture, with Michael Blackburn, soloist in Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto in A Minor, and trombonist Elijah Taurke performing Guilmant’s “Morceau Symphonique.” Renowned Cuban jazzman CHUCHO VALDÉS (pictured left above) plays two nights of solo piano, Monday and Tuesday, at Kuumbwa Jazz in Santa Cruz. For details and links to these and many other events, click our CALENDAR

anne-akiko-meyersSPEAKING OF VIOLINS

ANNE AKIKO MEYERS played her celebrated Guarneri “Vieuxtemps” with the Monterey Symphony exactly one year ago. At $16 million it’s the most expensive violin ever sold. Is all that Cremona legendary luster about to change? Two reports explain why it well might: from The Economist HERE and The Atlantic HERE

WHEN TOY PIANOS ARE STILL MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MET OPERA IN THE LAST 50 YEARS

A SURVEY since it moved house into Lincoln Center. Nothing short of an operatic history. Click HERE

THE GREATEST AMERICAN MUSIC TEACHERBoulanger-Nadia-01[1966]

WAS FRENCH. “Nadia Boulanger was the most astounding woman I ever met in my life,” Quincy Jones. Nadia Boulanger’s students include Jones, Aaron Copland, Virgil Thomson, Roy Harris, David Diamond, Leonard Bernstein, Ned Rorem, Elliott Carter, Astor Piazzolla and Philip Glass. She was the first woman to conduct the Boston Symphony and Philadelphia Orchestra. She played the world premiere of Copland’s Organ Symphony in 1925 in New York. She became the first woman to conduct a complete program by the New York Philharmonic in 1962, during the Bernstein years. Click HERE

COWS WHO LOVE JAZZ

DAIRY FARMER Ed Henderson’s audience captured him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOUNGE LIZARDS

QUATTRO MANI’s new CD takes its title from a witty 1994 piece for two pianos and percussion by Michael Daugherty, a talented composer of “American Icons,” pieces that celebrate our pop culture—like his Barbie opera, Superman Symphony and Le Tombeau de Liberace—its four movements are titled Sip ‘N’ Sir (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), Dennis Swing 9486_cover_rgb_3000x3000_2f939fbc-38ec-4728-968d-49196358c0a6_largeClub (Hamburg, Germany), Ramada Inn (Exit 1, New Jersey Turnpike) and Bamboo Bar (Amsterdam, the Netherlands.) The piece comes at the end of a wide-ranging survey of new American music, but also includes a fascinating recollection of Charles Ives’ largely experimental Three Quarter-tone Pieces of 1925. Quattro Mani consists of Steven Beck and Susan Grace, who deliver thoughtful and exuberant performances of John Musto’s Passacaglia (2000/2011) and Arlene Sierra’s of Risk and Memory (1997). Least memorable, perhaps for being too subtle for its own good, is Quiet Music (1994/2001) by Fred Lerdahl, a reduction from the earlier orchestra version which I have not heard. (Note: the Sip N Stir restaurant in Cedar Rapids is now closed; Daugherty’s misspelled title seems to have escaped all proofreaders.)

THE LIGHT SHE BRINGS

INTRODUCING now world-famous composer/pianist Joep Beving

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRESH THEATER REVIEW

HAROLD PINTER’S BETRAYAL at Carmel’s Circle Theatre. Click HERE

TRUE CONFESSION

HAVING PROCLAIMED Verdi’s Requiem as one of my ultimate ten Desert Island essentials, I’ve been set upon with demands to disclose the other nine. Fair enough: JS Bach’s St. Matthew Passion; Mozart’s Nozze di Figaro; Schubert’s String Quintet in C Major; Wagner’s Die Walküre and Tristan und Isolde; Brahms’ Ein deutches Requiem; Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique;” Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde; Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5. Each is included for its own specific/peculiar reasons, and, of course, is subject to change. Beethoven remains a huge fave but to date I can’t make up my mind. BTW, I love Haydn, Berlioz, Lou Harrison, the blues, the Beatles, Elton John, the Eagles, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone and Bill Evans.

Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca RC Brooks, associate editor