Weekly Magazine

THIS WEEK

HIDDEN VALLEY STRINGS in Carmel Valley and Santa Cruz. ROBERT WALTERS cor anglais recital at Hidden Valley. SMUIN BALLET (above) in Carmel. PG POPS ORCHESTRA in Pacific Grove. PACIFIC VOICES in Santa Cruz. TCHAIKOVSKY SPECTACULAR at Civic Auditorium. BELLINI’S OPERA NORMA in Santa Cruz. THE MIRACLE WORKER to open at The Western Stage. G&S’s PIRATES OF PENZANCE this weekend at UC Santa Cruz. For links to these and dozens of other live performance events, click on the display ads, left, or on our CALENDAR

2019 NEXT GENERATION JAZZ ORCHESTRA ANNOUNCED

OF THE 21 MEMBERS screened and selected by the Monterey Jazz Festival, six are women and ten are from California counties, though none from Santa Cruz or Monterey counties. Click HERE  

 

NEA’S JAZZ MASTERS 2020

JAZZ’S HIGHEST public honor will go to Roscoe Mitchell, Dorthaan Kirk, Reggie Workman and Bobby McFerrin at a ceremony in San Francisco next April. Click HERE 

AIRMAN JOHN WILLIAMS REMEMBERS

FAMED FILM COMPOSER from Los Angeles grew his skills as an Air Force band member, in 1950s Canada! He remembers the impact of World War II on his career in an interview. The affect on him of Stephen Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan loomed huge.  

 

‘INDOOR BEACH OPERA’ WINS AT VENICE

AND THE GOLDEN LION goes to… Click HERE 

THE HYPERTRAGIC NOTCH

IRIDESCENCE

ANY NEW FLUTE AND HARP recording inevitably contains a slew of welcome if obscure pieces, either new or just hidden away under a cabbage leaf. And so it goes for this collaboration by the principal flutist, Adria Sternstein Foster, and principal harpist, Susan Robinson, of the Kennedy Center Opera Orchestra, colleagues since the mid-1990s. New Zealander Gareth Farr composed Teheke, the Maori word for waterfall, each of three impressionistic movements inspired by three different waterfalls, the last the most animated. Vincent Persichetti’s eight- movement Serenade No. 10 dates from 1957 and packs a lot of contrasting moods into its 11 minutes. Stella Sung’s impressionistic Dance of the White Lotus Under the Silver Moon takes its inspiration from Japanese and Chinese screens that portray scenes from nature. Jacques Bondon (1927-2008) conveys the most mutual independence in his Le soleil multicolore with violist Daniel Foster joining the exciting three-movement fracas, which was completed on the day in 1969 when Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. The duo completes their program with Naiades Fantasy Sonata by British flutist and composer William Alwyn (1905-1985) completes the program. You can find more information on these fine artists at ibischambermusic.org.

CHARLIE CHAPLIN FILM COMPOSER  

IN 1996 MARIN ALSOP and the Cabrillo Festival performed a concert that included the coupling of a Looney Tunes (Tom and Jerry) cartoon—Quiet Please, and its original film score by composer Scott Bradley—played live by the Cabrillo Orchestra. (It climaxed with an unforgettable shattering of glass.) A lot of the slapstick and romantic film music can trace itself back to the enormous amount of music for silent films, of all styles, composed or arranged by actor Charlie Chaplin in the era before the “talkies” and even later. This collection is drawn from those films’ soundtracks—between 1931 and 1976—in two CDs on the Le Champs du Monde label, just released. It is a treasure trove for film historians and film composers, no few of whom live among us on the Monterey Bay. It has added urgency given the new June two-CDs release that contains 101 short pieces remastered from 16 of Chaplin’s originals. Among the films will be found City Lights, Modern Times (“Smile,” who could forget that tune?), The Great Dictator (a bit from Wagner’s Tannhäuser and Brahms’ Hungarian Dance No 5), Gold Rush (where the music turns briefly into stereo), Limelight (with its unforgettable “Eternally”), A Dog’s Life, The Kid, Sunnyside and A Woman of Paris. Any composer today could do a lot worse than to study this music and spin gold from it. It contains Chaplin’s must-be-heard final speech from The Great Dictator:   

AND to learn more about it, click HERE

HOW COULD THIS BE MORE WRONG?

UNLESS YOU WANT TO BUY an expensive Fazioli concert grand piano, an Aston Martin sportscar or an implicit roll in the hay with a prestidigitating puff called Lola Astanova. At least it’s good for a sardonic laugh. 

 

NEW RICHARD BRANSON RELEASE

ABC CLASSIC presents The Environmental Symphony, an ambitious and epic work that spans five billion years, from the formation of the planet through to the devastation of our current age. To be released on United Nations World Environment Day, Wednesday June 5, The Environmental Symphony sounds a warning of what will happen if we don’t act boldly and decisively to address our climate crisis, but ends with an optimistic vision of a greener, cleaner future. With music by the genre-bending Allan Zavod, words by Australia’s chief scientist Alan Finkel, narrated by Richard Branson, and performed by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and conductor Benjamin Northey, this recording is a major international release that lends some musical muscle to the ongoing political and environmental fight against climate change. 

 

HOW TO RIP OFF MUSICIANS

HOPE against fraud. Click HERE 

HOW PLEDGE DRIVES WORK

TURNS OUT it’s a generational thing. Click HERE 

UNWELCOME RETURNING ASTRONAUT

GLORIA GAYNOR classic set the bar in 1978. Don’t you forget it.

 

FRESH REVIEWS

PIANIST JURA MARGULIS, MUSIC IN MAY and VLADA MORAN plays Bach on old/new organ at St John’s in Aptos. Click HERE

NEXT WEEK

KEITH UNDERWOOD flute recital at Hidden Valley. AVANT GARDEN PARTY in Soquel. GRUPO FOLKLORICO LOS MEJICAS at UCSC. MUSIC OF LARRY POLANSKY at UCSC. MONTEREY SYMPHONY’S process for choosing a new music during the 2020-21 season.

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Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca CR Brooks, associate editor