Weekly Magazine

CANCELED EVENTS THIS WEEK

SANTA CRUZ JAZZ FESTIVAL at Cabrillo College. GOLDEN GATE CHAMBER PLAYERS at Hidden Valley. AN EVENING OF FLAMENCO at Hidden Valley. ARIA WOMEN’S CHOIR in Salinas and Pacific Grove. PIANIST BENJAMIN GROSVENOR for Carmel Music Society. SANTA CRUZ CHAMBER PLAYERS’ Roy Malan string quartet with pianist Robin Sutherland. SANTA CRUZ CHORALE hosts visiting New Choir. SANTA CRUZ BAROQUE’S April 5 “In an English Garden.” MANHATTAN TRANSFER at Kuumbwa. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST at Mountain Community Theater. Of course, the COVID-19 situation remains highly dynamic and more cancellations and postponements are likely in the near future. We’ll do our best to keep you apprised, including updates as we learn more.

EVENTS ON THIS WEEK’S CALENDAR

CABARET (photo above) opens at Paper Wing in Monterey.  FOR LINKS to these performance events click on our CALENDAR 

IMPACT OF COVID-19 SO FAR

SANTA CRUZ SYMPHONY cancels March concerts, postpones April percussion recital. SUNSET CENTER in Carmel is closed through the end of March. CHERRY CENTER in Carmel postpones upcoming events. THE WESTERN STAGE at Hartnell College suspends its SpringFest. KUUMBWA JAZZ CENTER in Santa Cruz cancels all events until “at least” April 2. ESPRESSIVO cancels its April “Jazz” program. PACREP postpones Marjorie Prime. JEWEL THEATRE reschedules Simon Stephens’ Heisenberg to June. WORLD THEATER at CSUMB has pushed its upcoming Lula Washington Dance program to next spring and the Reyna de Los Angeles Mariachi concert to this fall. SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY cancels all concerts though April.

MESSAGE FROM PAPER WING THEATRE

WE WANT TO REACH OUT and reassure our patrons that we are taking extra precautions at the Paper Wing Theatre to ensure your safety. At this time, no warnings or restrictions have been issued for small venues like ours which seat less than a hundred people. We are also instituting something called buffered seating, which cuts down the amount of seats available for purchase and ensures that people can put extra space between them and another party if they choose. Disinfectant wipes, plenty of hand sanitizing stations, and good old-fashioned soap and hot water will be readily available for everyone. We do ask that if you are feeling sick, you make plans to reschedule your night at our theater. We will honor any previously purchased ticket for any future Paper Wing show; simply email us your preference. We hope this answers any questions you may have as your safety and the safety of our cast and crew is most important to us. Thank you in advance for your continued support of local art and artists!
Koly McBride, Creator and CEO of Paper Wing Theatre

SC SYMPHONY’S MUSICIAN RELIEF FUND

“THE SANTA CRUZ SYMPHONY Musician Relief Fund has been established to raise money to help support our musicians who are being hit hard by the lack of work during the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. With the cancellation of all concerts and events throughout the Bay Area, many of our musicians have little to no viable means of income.” You can help. Click HERE

DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 2020-21 SEASON

ONLY ALL-BEETHOVEN season announced so far to celebrate the composer’s 250th birthday. Features pianist Soheil Nasseri, fortepianist Nicholas Matthews, pianist John O’Conor, and a “Ludwig van Beerthoven Party.”

COMPOSER CHARLES WUORINEN, 1938-2020

THE WIDELY PERFORMED composer Charles Wuorinen died on Wednesday from complications after suffering a fall in September 2019. He was 81. He leaves around 270 works, mostly written in 12-note style with complex yet elegant and accessible themes. The most attention was claimed by the opera Brokeback Mountain, commissioned by Gerard Mortier for the Teatro Real in Madrid and premiered there in January 2014. Wuorinen also received commissions from Christoph von Dohnanyi at Cleveland and James Levine at the Boston Symphony. New York City Opera premiered his opera Haroun and the Sea of Stories based on the novel by Salman Rushdie in 2004. New York born, he founded The Group for Contemporary Music to promote such fellow modernists as Milton Babbitt, Elliott Carter and Stefan Wolpe. He won a Pulitzer at age 32 and a Macarthur Fellowship a decade later. He taught at Columbia and Manhattan School of Music. His interests included fractal geometry, astrophysics, Egyptology and Chinese calligraphy. Notable students include Michael Daugherty, Aaron Jay Kernis, Peter Lieberson and Tobias Picker.

BSO FLUTE LEGEND ANTHONY DWYER DIES

DORIOT ANTHONY DWYER, principal flute of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1952 to 1990, died yesterday in Kansas at the age of 98. She was only the second woman to win a principal chair in a major US orchestra, behind Helen Kotas, who became principal horn of the Chicago Symphony in 1941. Doriot was a legend among US orchestral musicians, leaving a lasting imprint on the Boston sound. Her application for the position was supported by no less than Bruno Walter, who heard her play in the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra. Boston had no changing room for women. Her first appearance was greeted with the headline: Woman Crashes Boston Symphony: Eyebrows Lifted as Miss Anthony sat at Famous Flutist’s Desk. Approached by a reporter in 1952, she said: ‘Gradually, during my life, I’ve got used to the idea that I’m a woman.’

CELLIST ZSOLT BOGNÁR & BILL MURRAY?

 

SF APPEALS COURT FAVORS LED ZEPPELIN

“STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN” did not infringe on copyright for Spirit’s Taurus. Click HERE

EXILES IN PARADISE

Brinton Smith & Evelyn Chen, cello-piano duo

 

THE HYPERTRAGIC NOTCH

WHAT A GREAT ADVENTURE is this new Hyperian CD, as Steven Osborne tackles Serge Prokofiev’s piano sonatas numbers Six in A (1940), Seven in B-flat (1942) and Eight in B-flat (1944). And while the CD subtitles the program “War Sonatas,” there is little hint of it in the music. Shostakovich, by contrast, used the war as inspiration for several of his works during that period. And like Shostakovich, in no small number of works Prokofiev hews faithfully to the classical forms. But Prokofiev goes far deeper into modernity in these works, which are technically extremely formidable. But that’s only the half of it. Osborne also has to create interpretive artistry at the same time. This he does with breathtaking authority and flash. In many of these ten movements Prokofiev changes mood from fierce percussiveness to ironic humor to tender lyricism, all well known features of musical personality. After the complex opening movement of the Sixth sonata, a jaunty allegretto gives way to a “lentissimo” waltz that grows unexpectedly restless and moody. The finale movement, like those of the two other sonatas, begins in moto perpetuo, but lapses into a sighing andante midway. The opening of the three-movement Seventh begins with a sarcastic march and is marked Allegro inquieto, changes into an andantino then reprises the opening. Its second movement, Andante caloroso (warmly), is Prokofiev at his most lyrical, moving to animato then back to caloroso. The finale is pure perpetual motion, sparks flying in all directions. The Eighth opens—at 15 minutes the longest movement of all—Andante dolce (sweetly); it grows animated, returns to the dolce, then fires up to a brilliant Allegro. The second movement, Andante sognando (dreamy) then gives way to another fireworks show that frames a strongly accented Allegro and a gentle Andantino. These sonatas haven’t often made it into keyboard programs lately. Too bad. Osborne shows how and why they should be. (The album cover is Marianne von Werefkin’s “City in Lithuania” of 1914. Click on it to enlarge.) SM

HERE’S THAT RAINY DAY

CLASSIC by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Burke.

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Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca CR Brooks, associate editor