Weekly Magazine

GO BEARS! And banana slugs

NEW THIS WEEK

VIOLINIST EDWIN HUIZINGA STREAMS

HE JOINS gamba player Lynn Tetenbaum and harpsichordist Linda Berman Hall Saturday evening, repeating Sunday morning for a program of Baroque music. Click HERE

KIKI WOW MUSICAL SUNDAY CAVALCADE

IMPRESARIO KIKI WHITMAN has assembled a Monterey County cast of artists to be streamed on August 23, starting at 6pm on Facebook. Click HERE

WENDY SUTTER’S BACH CELLO SUITES

TO BE PERFORMED and streamed in two parts this Sunday. She played Philip Glass’ Cello Concerto at the Cabrillo Festival. Click HERE

CSO CREATES ‘DIVERSITY OFFICER’

AS PART OF the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s (CSO) 10-point Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Action Plan, a job has been created for an executive to implement the policy. ‘The creation of an executive-level Chief Diversity Officer places the Cincinnati Symphony at the leading edge of change in the orchestra field,’ said Jesse Rosen, President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras. ‘Our research confirms that one of the biggest barriers to progress is the lack of staff capacity. This move by the CSO models the level of commitment it takes to bring about equitable, diverse and inclusive organizations.’ ~Norman Lebrecht

CABRILLO 2020 PROGRAMS AVAILABLE

CABRILLO STREAMED programs will remain available indefinitely. The first of them, Reflecting, recounted the Festival’s history and includes extensive commentary by co-founder Robert Hughes and former music director Dennis Russell Davies. It also includes Robert T Little’s The Conjured Life and Lou Harrison’s Symphony No. 3. Click HERE

JULIAN BREAM, 1933-2020

LEGENDARY ENGLISH guitarist who also revived Elizabethan lute music by John Dowland, others. Composers who wrote original works for Bream include Benjamin Britten, William Walton, Richard Rodney Bennett, Hans Werner Henze, Reginald Smith Brindle, Malcolm Arnold, Stephen Dodgson, Alan Rawsthorne, Peter Maxwell Davies, Toru Takemitsu, Leo Brouwer, Lennox Berkeley, and many more. Richard Attenborough interviews Bream and composer Malcolm Arnold, 1963.

BBC’S Sean Rafferty visited Bream at home in Wiltshire in 2013.

 

R U A SAXOPHOBE OR A SAXOPHILE?

FROM MACRO to micro. Click HERE

MOZART GROUP TRIES IMPRESSING WOMEN

AMERICA’S FIRST WOMEN COMPOSERS

 

THE HYPERTRAGIC NOTCH

WELL-KNOWN REGIONALLY and a rapidly rising solo cello star, Jonah Kim’s luscious new CD was released just last week. He joins pianist Sean Kennard in sonatas by two of the most gifted composers of long-limbed melodies, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Samuel Barber. The relatively late-blooming Russian was 28 in 1901 when he completed his cello sonata. Barber was 22 in 1932 when he composed his. The first movement of the Rachmaninoff draws unmistakably on the composer’s Second Piano Concerto. (Both works were premiered in November, 1901, with Rachmaninoff at the piano.) The energetic second movement, apparently imitating Schubert’s Erlkönig, also detours to the Second Piano Concerto. As an example of the composer’s gift for haunting melody, and Kim’s artistry, listen to the clip below. The ambitious final movement follows the pattern of the second, animated but with a gorgeous singing heart.

SONG WAS ALSO at the heart of Barber’s music, though his sonata is cut from American cloth and arguably from a very different era. Restless and ambiguous to start, a melody emerges on the cello, echoed on piano, that will haunt you. But that tease is soon set aside for some more mystery, disturbing keyboard passages and further angst. As the storm abates the cello melody floats again to the surface, with the keyboard’s affirmation. The ensuing Adagio sings with resignation, until it is interrupted by a swirling presto that dispels any residual doubts, followed by a return of the adagio mood. The final allegro storms out of the gate, now clearly optimistic, despite some abrupt changes of character. Kim, who plays a Haide Lin instrument, copied from an 1845 Jean-Baptiste Vuillaume, went to Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, one year ago to record this program with Kennard, who is on the piano faculty there. The two met as teenagers at the Curtis Institute. You need to hear them now! SM

LETTERS

SO HAPPY to hear about Kirke Mechem’s book. He gave me one of the nicest compliments I ever received after we performed Songs of the Slave in Santa Cruz. ~Larry Granger, San Diego (Former Santa Cruz Symphony music director.)

THANKS VERY MUCH for the fine article on Kirke Mecham. Back in the ’50s at Stanford, in the tiny music department library, he was just beginning to spend more time on music than on tennis. (Found his tennis picture in the Quad, and me accompanying the University Chorus at the piano.)  It was a joy to read about Kirke’s accomplishments in his splendid career, and to say music has been my “rock” as well. What a journey! ~Eleanor (Fudge) Avila, Carmel Valley

A PROPOS ‘ATONAL’ MUSIC

REFERENCED in the previous Weekly Magazine’s feature on composer Kirke Mechem, in which he describes 12-tone music as a “calamity.”

 

ENSEMBLE MONTEREY ARCHIVES

TO ACCESS, click HERE

THE FUTURE OF DANCE

AN ONLINE STRATEGY. Click HERE

THE GIRL WITH THE FLAXEN HAIR

ÉLISE FAHIE, 5, with the Mike Fahie Jazz Orchestra. Album to be released next week.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @PerfArtsMtyBay

Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca CR Brooks, associate editor