Weekly Magazine

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THIS WEEK

JEWEL THEATRE presents the world premiere of Kate Hawley’s Coming of Age at the Colligan in Santa Cruz. MONTEREY SYMPHONY and guest conductor Conner Gray Covington perform an all-Mozart program, including the “Jupiter” Symphony and the Piano Concerto No. 21 with soloist Michael Davidman. SANTA CRUZ JAZZ FESTIVAL concentrates two full days of professional and student ensembles at Cabrillo College. GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA (above) coming to Pacific Grove. MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY THEATER opens Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar in Ben Lomond. James Garner’s tribute to Johnny Cash, “WALK THE LINE,” World Theater at CSU Monterey Bay. For links to these and many more performing arts events click our CALENDAR or the ads, left.

CABRILLO FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES 2018 SEASON

THE CABRILLO FESTIVAL of Contemporary Music, America’s longest running festival of new orchestral music, celebrates its 56th season and the second season of its esteemed Music Director and Conductor, Cristian Măcelaru, July 29 – August 12, 2018. Among the season’s highlights are two world premieres, three US premieres and eight West Coast premieres. The Festival also commemorates the 80th birthday of two American music icons: William Bolcom and John Corigliano. Seventeen of the eighteen featured composers will be in residence this season, including Karim Al-Zand, William Bolcom, Anna Clyne, John Corigliano, Dan Dediu, Zosha di Castri, Gabriela Lena Frank, Vivian Fung, Michael Gandolfi, Pierre Jalbert, Kristin Kuster, Missy Mazzoli, Huang Ruo, Pande Shahov, Sean Shepherd, Peter Shin and Andrea Tarrodi. This represents a record number of composers in residence, and a record number of female composers. Special guest artists include Simon Trpčeski (piano), Mary Mackenzie (soprano), Philippe Quint (violin), Kronos QuartetPhilip Edward Fisher (piano), Nicholas Phan (tenor) and Justin Bruns (violin).

SEASIDE HIGH SCHOOL AMONG WINNERS OF $10K GRANTS

FIFTY HIGH SCHOOLS have risen above 1,000 applicants to claim NBC’s R.I.S.E. America grants. The program—inspired by the network’s upcoming drama “Rise” about a high school theater department and its effects on a small town—is awarding a half-million dollars to high school theater programs across the country. Through R.I.S.E. (Recognizing and Inspiring Student Expression) America, NBC has awarded each of the 50 winning schools with a $10,000 grant that will cover the critical needs of their theater programs ranging from production expenses to technical equipment and master classes. NBC is facilitating the program in partnership with the Educational Theatre Foundation (ETF), a non-profit organization dedicated to shaping lives through theater education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTS ADD $763.6 BILLION TO US ECONOMY

THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION wants to kill the NEA cash cow fiscal stimulant: New data released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) offers an insightful picture of the impact the arts have on the nation’s economy. The arts contribute $763.6 billion to the U.S. economy, more than agriculture, transportation, or warehousing.  The arts employ 4.9 million workers across the country with earnings of more than $370 billion. Furthermore, the arts exported $20 billion more than imported, providing a positive trade balance.

  • The arts added four times more to the U.S. economy than the agricultural sector and $200 billion more than transportation or warehousing.
  • The arts saw a $20 billion trade surplus, leading with movies and TV programs and jewelry.
  • The arts trended positively between 2012 and 2015 with an average growth rate of 2.6 percent, slightly higher than 2.4 percent for the nation’s overall economy. Between 2014 and 2015, the growth rate was 4.9 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars.

ICSOM MUSICIANS PAY THROUGH THE NOSE

CONGRESS’ NEW TAX CUTS specifically hurt members of the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians. Click HERE

SECRETS OF THE VIOLIN

A VISIT TO CREMONA hosted by international artist Daniel Hope

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREE COMPOSERS ON THE NECESSITY & PITFALLS OF POLITICAL MUSIC

DAVID LANG, CAROLINE SHAW and TED HEARNE comment, with musical examples. Click HERE

WHAT WRITERS MUST LEARN FROM DANCERS

ZADIE SMITH starts with the difference between Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, and goes from there, including a video of the incomparable Nicholas Brothers. Click HERE

JS BACH: MASTER OF SUSPENSE AND DISGUISE

034571281810A NEW RECORDING of Bach’s Mass in B Minor discloses the supremacy and desperation of the greatest composer of the Western classical tradition, the namesake hero of the Carmel Bach Festival—more or less. (In any case, to ‘sell’ Bach is first to love Bach; ‘less’ simply won’t do it.) For me and many others, the greatest recording of this oddly-hybrid masterpiece is, and remains, that of Michel Corboz and his Ensemble Vocal & Instrumental de Lausanne—specifically the 1972 recording, issued in this country by RCA in 1974. Inexplicably, it has never been reissued on CD. Yet the original LP release (pictured right) can still be found and purchased—used in all cases—from sellers online. (A subsequent 1996 live recording from Montreux captures all the handprints of the original Corboz, and a stellar cast of soloists, but is marred by R-7026946-1431978342-8447.jpegsome performance glitches.) What makes Corboz such a master of the piece is a dramatic instinct rather than an obsession with fidelity to authenticity. His attention to dynamics, phrasing and musical values is not in question; it’s his over-arching conception that makes sense of it all and trumps the competition with, for want of a better word, spiritual energy. He dances the piece. But now to Stephen Layton’s new Hyperion CD with the Choir of Trinity College Cambridge—superb!—and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment—outstanding. The vocal soloists navigate the coloratura melismas admirably, though bass Neal Davies makes it sound like a lot of hard work and tenor Gwilym Bowen produces an unlovely sound. The high voices—soprano Katherine Watson, mezzo Helen Charlston and countertenor Iestyn Davies—deliver the goods. But for the comparison with Corboz in 1974, this new release scores big points. SM

PAMB SEEKS INTERN CRITICS

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS resident in Monterey and Santa Cruz counties involved in performing arts—music, theater and dance—with a nose for journalism/criticism are invited to apply for an internship with Performing Arts Monterey Bay. We offer successful candidates a published byline and the mentorship of our four-decades in Monterey Bay performing arts journalism. Applicants are asked to submit fleshed-out samples of their writing, provide supporting background in the performing arts and contact information to editor@performingartsmontereybay.com

TED STANDUP COMEDY

SARAH JONES slays ‘em as eight different characters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRESH REVIEW

SANTA CRUZ CHAMBER PLAYERS, click HERE

NEXT WEEK

SANTA CRUZ SYMPHONY features winner of the 31st Klein String Competition, a stunning virtuoso of the double bass, and a world premiere by conductor Daniel Stewart. SMUIN Dance Series 1 comes to Carmel. CARMEL MUSIC SOCIETY welcomes the Israeli Chamber Project. CELLIST COLIN CARR plays a Big Sur Inn benefit at Hidden Valley.

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Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca CR Brooks, associate editor