Weekly Magazine

HAPLeontyne_Price_(b&w)_by_Jack_MitchellPY 90th BIRTHDAY LEONTYNE PRICE

THIS FRIDAY. Star of the world’s opera stages from the 1950s to 1985, and continued singing recitals and orchestral concerts into the mid-‘90s, she sang for the Carmel Music Society in 1961 and 1986. Here she sings Samuel Barber’s “The Monk and his Cat,” with the composer at the piano.

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMING UP THIS WEEK

NO SHORTAGE OF VALENTINES. Frederica von Stade, “Flicka,” returns to Carmel with composer/pianist Jake Heggie. Santa Cruz Chamber Players celebrate the Human Journey. Branford Marsalis plays Kuumbwa. See our CALENDAR for details and links.

KEVIN PUTS’ SILENT NIGHT

BRILLIANT OPERA of the miraculous Christmas Eve, 1914, opens Saturday at Opera San Jose. Click HERE

SALINAS’ MIA PAK GETS NATIONAL HONOR

MUSICAL THEATER student, daughter of Jung-Ho Pak and Erica Horn, among 60 nominated for 2017 Presidential Scholars in the Arts, announced by National YoungArts Foundation. Candidates were selected from 21 states and the District of Columbia, in nine artistic disciplines. Excellence in artistic and academic achievements are required. Twenty nominees will be selected, with an awards ceremony set for June at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC.

AMARGOSA OPERA FOUNDER DIES

MARTA BECKET gave Death Valley Junction its cultural heart. Click HERE

CARRIE’S DREAM SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT

CHARISMATIC CARRIE McCOID, native of Felton, remembered in annual scholarship fundraising event, this Sunday, 1 and again at 5 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DANCING ON AIR

MEET INKA TIITTO, ‘indoor skydiver,’ who gives dance a new meaning, I think.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EL PASO & CIUDAD JUAREZ YOUTH ORCHESTRAS

ALREADY BUILDING “THE BRIDGE” over Trump’s wall. Click HERE

NEW SOUTH AMERICAN DISCOVERIESSouth American

CONDUCTOR MIGUEL HARTH-BEDOYA took some southern sunshine to his Norwegian Radio Orchestra and recorded eight pieces by composers from Peru, Columbia, Chile, Ecuador and Bolivia, all written between 2000 and 2011. These composers learned their craft at home and abroad. There’s no shortage of either energy or vivid color here. Wayra means ‘wind’ in the Inca language Quechua, and blows, according to composer Jorge Villavicencio Grossmann. Victor Agudelo’s El Sombrerón, a large black hat intended to scare drunkards and gamblers, at turns witty and menacing; it ends with the musicians whistling, another spooky orchestral color. Sebastián Vergara’s Mecánica begins mysteriously, then drives toward a climax but settles instead into quiet reflection. Diego Luzuriaga’s Responsorio is the first to actually quote a folksong, from the highlands of Ecuador; a piccolo plays ‘leader’ of the orchestra, all above a ritualized ostinato drum beat. Diego Vega’s Música Muisca imagines a pre-Hispanic culture of Columbia, but with modern orchestral instruments. Sebastián Errázuriz’ La Caravana marches solemnly but pauses for, what else?, a siesta. Then comes the mysterious, nocturnal Una música escondida (A hidden music) a 15-minute three-movement piano concerto by Agustín Fernández, that alternates two different pianists; the final movement steps out from the shadows into the dawn under a steady pulse. In an odd or intentional juxtaposition, Icarus by Antonio Gervasoni is pictographic, like much of the composer’s film music. If unfamiliar music by composers with unfamiliar names gives you doubt, then trust your ears. They won’t be disappointed.

WHERE’S THE LOVE?

WITH DOZENS of your faves teaming up against the opposite.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRESH REVIEW

MADAGASCAR, LIVE at PacRep. Click HERE

Scott MacClelland, editor; Rebecca RC Brooks, associate editor